Assertions about Karma from the Mahayana Sutra Basket

Let us first examine the main assertions concerning karmic impulses and revealing and nonrevealing forms in the Mahayana Sutra Basket and then, in the next part of this series, in the Sarvastivada Abhidharma Basket. These are the forerunners of some of the main features of the Vaibhashika and Madhyamaka presentations of karma. 

Revealing Forms 

In The Sutra on Repaying the Kindness of the Buddha, the Great Skillful One in Methods (Thabs-mkhas-pa chen-po sangs-rgyas drin-lan bsab-pa’i mdo), translated into Tibetan from Chinese, Buddha discusses the ethical self-discipline (tshul-khrims, Skt. śīla) of the constructive actions of refraining from destructive behavior. This ethical self-discipline entails, initially, requesting and acquiring monastic or lay vows and, subsequently, refraining from what one has vowed not to do or say. Thus, Buddha states in the sutra (Derge Kangyur vol. 76, 174A-B): 

Furthermore, there are four types of ethical self-discipline that each (being), out of all limited beings, can acquire. When each of these four types of ethical self-discipline are divided, they become 12 types of ethical self-discipline. There are three (mental factors) that give rise to, are the causes of, and are the conditions for (each of) the four faults of turning away from not taking a life, not taking what was not given, not keeping chaste behavior, and not lying. In other words, these (faults) can arise from longing desire, they can arise from anger, and they can arise from naivety. Because of that, (each being, out of) all these limited beings, has these 12 destructive actions. Therefore, (each of them) can acquire 12 types of revealing forms of the ethical self-discipline of the constructive actions (of taking monastic vows) to turn away from these destructive actions. All fathomless number of limited beings can also acquire these like that….
Furthermore, all limited beings produce seven types of negative karmic actions of body and speech. The production of these negative karmic actions also arises from three types of causes and conditions. They, too, can arise from longing desire, they can arise from anger, and they can arise from naivety. Like that, the seven types of negative karmic actions can arise from these three causes and conditions. And like that, the seven types of negative karmic actions become 21. When the ethical self-discipline comes about (of taking vows to) turn away from these negative karmic actions, then one limited being has 21 revealing forms of ethical self-discipline. Similarly, it is also like that for all limited beings.
(Tib.) yang tshul khrims thob pa ni sems can thams cad la so so nas tshul khrims bzhi thob par ‘gyur te/ tshul khrims bzhi so sor dbye na tshul khrims bcu gnyis su ‘gyur ro/ /sems can la srog mi gcod pa dang / ma byin par mi len pa dang / mi tshangs par mi spyod pa dang / brdzun mi smra bas bzlog pa’i nyes pa bzhi skye ba yang rgyu dang rkyen gsum gyi phyir te/ de yang ‘dod chags las skye ba dang / zhe sdang las skye ba dang / gti mug las skye ba’o/ /sems can thams cad la mi dge ba bcu gnyis po ‘di yod de/ mi dge ba ‘di las bzlog na dge ba’i tshul khrims kyi rnam par rig byed kyi gzugs bcu gnyis thob par ‘gyur ro/ /dpag tu med pa’i sems can thams cad la thob pa yang de dang ‘dra’o/….
sems can thams cad la lus dang ngag gi sdig pa bdun ‘byung ste/ sdig pa ‘byung ba ‘di yang rgyu dang rkyen rnam pa gsum gyis skye’o/ /de yang ‘dod chags kyis skye ba dang / zhe sdang gis skye ba dang / gti mug gis skye ba ste/ de ltar na rgyu dang rkyen gsum gyis sdig pa bdun skye ste/ de ltar na mi dge ba’i sdig pa bdun gsum nyi shu gcig go/ /sdig pa de las bzlog na tshul khrims su ‘gyur te/ sems can gcig la tshul khrims kyi rnam par rig byed kyi gzugs nyi shu rtsa gcig yod pa bzhin du sems can thams cad la yang de dang ‘dra’o/

Here, when Buddha speaks of ethical self-discipline (tshul-khrims, Skt. śīla), he is using it as a synonym for a monastic or lay vowed restraint (sdom-pa, Skt. vrata; a vow). Vasubandhu corroborates this in his Treasure House of Special Topics of Knowledge, Put in Verses (Chos mngon-pa’i mdzod-kyi tshig-le’ur byas-pa, Skt. Abhidharmakośa-kārikā) (IV.16ab) (Gretil ed., Derge Tengyur vol. 140, 11B): 

A vowed restraint, (which is) a karmic impulse, is also called “ethical self-discipline” and “something enacted that is excellent .” 
(Skt.) śīlaṃ sucaritaṃ karmasaṃvaraścocyate punaḥ 
(Tib.) /tshul khrims dang ni legs spyad dang / /las dang sdom pa zhes bya’o/

The vowed restraint may be that of a full monk or nun to refrain from ever committing the four destructive actions of taking a life, taking what has not been given, engaging in unchaste behavior and lying. If any of the four are transgressed, it constitutes a “defeat” (phas pham-pa, Skt, pārājika) and loss of the vows. Since transgressing any of these four vows may arise from any of the three poisonous disturbing emotions – longing desire, anger or naivety – the vows to refrain from committing the four have 12 revealing forms – three in relation to each of the four destructive actions.

The vow may also be of a layperson to refrain from ever committing one the seven destructive actions of body and speech – taking a life, taking what has not been given, engaging in inappropriate sexual behavior, lying, speaking divisively, speaking harshly, and chattering meaninglessly. Since committing any of these destructive actions may also arise from any of the three poisonous disturbing emotions, the vows to refrain from committing the seven have 21 revealing forms – three in relation to each of the seven destructive actions.

Sutra on Repaying the Kindness (Derge 175A) continues: 

When first receiving the regulations (of monastic or lay vowed restraints), as soon as the karmic impulse of (these) four – (kneeling and) petitioning for and requesting (the vowed restraints three times) – has been enacted, the ethical self-discipline is fully attained. The revealing form of the ethical self-discipline (that arises with) the initial mental urge (sems) is called “a karmic impulse” and is also called “a pathway of a karmic impulse.” The revealing forms of the ethical self-discipline (that arise) from subsequent moments of mental urges are called “karmic impulses” but not “pathways of karmic impulses.” 
Being like that, the revealing form of the ethical self-discipline (that arises) from the first moment of the (initial) mental urge fully arises as an incited (karmic impulse) (bsam-pa). It is called “a pathway of an incited karmic impulse” by means of it (being in a pathway that) contains what has been incited. Because the revealing forms of subsequent ethical self-discipline, having been caused by the previous ethical self-discipline, automatically and spontaneously establish themselves, then although they are called “karmic impulses,” they are not pathways of karmic impulses. 
(Tib.) thog ma khrims nod pa’i tshe gsol ba dang zhu ba bzhi’i las byas ma thag tu tshul khrims rdzogs par ‘gyur te/ thog ma’i sems skad cig ma dang po’i tshul khrims kyi rnam par rig byed kyi gzugs ni las zhes kyang bya/ las kyi lam zhes kyang bya’o/ /sems skad cig ma phyi ma las khrims kyi rnam par rig byed kyi gzugs byung ba ni las zhes bya’i/ las kyi lam ma yin no/ /de lta bas na sems kyi skad cig ma dang po las tshul khrims kyi rnam par rig byed kyi gzugs bsam pa yongs su rdzogs te/ bsam pa dang ldan pas bsam pa’i las kyi lam zhes bya’o/ /tshul khrims snga mas rgyu byas te/ tshul khrims lhag ma’i rnam par rig byed kyi gzugs lhun gyis grub pas de bas na de la las zhes bya’i las kyi lam ma yin no/

One aspect of the ethical self-disciple of a vowed restraint, then, is the set of revealing forms (rnam-par rig-byed-kyi gzugs, Skt. vijñaptirūpa) of the constructive actions of requesting and acquiring the vow. These revealing forms refer to the form of the body kneeling on one knee to receive and acquire the vows and the form of the speech repeating three times the words of the pledge to uphold them. They are the methods implemented for causing the action of acquiring the vows to take place. These revealing forms occur during the first phase of possessing ethical self-discipline. The revealing forms of possessing the ethical self-discipline of the vowed restraints that occur during subsequent phases refer to the revealing forms of the body and speech that are the methods implemented for causing a restraint to take place from committing the actions that one has pledged to abstain from. 

In short, the revealing forms of the ethically disciplined body having, for instance, a vowed restraint of not taking the life of any sentient being are:

  • The body kneeling on one knee when acquiring the vowed restraint 
  • The body holding back from smacking a mosquito when subsequently keeping that vow.

Inciting and Incited Karmic Impulses

Buddha identifies these revealing forms as karmic impulses (las, Skt. karma), and Vaibhashika and Madhyamaka accept this identification. Buddha further explains that the revealing forms during the first phase of mind of requesting and acquiring the vowed restraints are brought about as a bsam-pa. Although the original Sanskrit of the text has been lost, the Sanskrit for the Tibetan term bsam-pa found throughout the abhidharma literature is cetayitvā. It is used in conjunction with the term sems-pa, in Sanskrit cetanā. Both Sanskrit terms derive from the verbal root cit, which, in this context, means “to mentally urge,” or, more simply, “to urge.” 

  • Cetanā is a verbal noun from this root and means an “urging.” 
  • Cetayitvā is a gerund made from the causative strengthening of the root, used with a past tense meaning as “being caused by an urging.” 

Thus, we find in the abhidharma literature the Sanskrit terms cetanākarma (an urging karmic impulse) and cetayitvākarma (a karmic impulse being caused by an urging).

All karmic actions of body, speech and mind are propelled by the mental factor of an urging – or, more simply put, they are driven by the mental factor of an urge (sems-pa, Skt. cetanā). As also explained in the abhidharma literature, the mental factor of an urge, as a karmic impulse of the mind, propels a consciousness and its other accompanying mental factors, causing them to engage the body, speech or mind in committing a karmic action. Among the cluster of mental factors that accompanies the consciousness is always an intention. An intention (‘dun-pa, Skt. chandas) is a wish to think, do or say something and may or may not be decisive about implementing that wish, or intent. It is important not to confuse the urge with the intention; they are two separate mental factors that, nevertheless, always occur in conjunction with each other. 

In the Vaibhashika and Madhyamaka systems, the term “urging karmic impulses” is used with both a general and a specific meaning: 

  • The general meaning is as the mental factor of an urge that propels, or drives, the consciousness and its other accompanying mental factors during an action of body, speech or mind. 
  • In the context of the ten constructive and ten destructive actions of body, speech and mind, the specific meaning is the mental factor of an urge that drives the mental consciousness and its other accompanying mental factors to think over and decide to do something – in the case of the above sutra quotation, to take on a vowed restraint. To avoid confusion, we shall translate this specific usage as an “inciting karmic impulse.” It incites the karmic impulse for a subsequent urge for an action of body or speech to enact the action one has decided to do.

Thus:

  • Urging karmic impulses (the mental factor of an urge) drive both the mental consciousness when thinking over and deciding to take on a vowed restraint and the sensory consciousness that engages the body when kneeling to acquire the vow not to kill and when subsequently refraining from smacking the mosquito.
  • Only the urging karmic impulse that drives the mental consciousness when thinking over and deciding to take the vow is an inciting karmic impulse.

Vaibhashika and Madhyamaka use the term “karmic impulse being caused by an urging” only with the specific meaning of a “karmic impulse being caused by a previous urging.” This too is in the context of its presentation of the ten constructive and ten destructive actions of body, speech and mind. 

  • Such a karmic impulse is the revealing form in an action of body or speech that is preceded by a karmic action of mind that is driven by an inciting karmic impulse. 
  • We shall translate such an impulse as an “incited karmic impulse.” 

In the above quotation, the revealing form during the first phase of mind of requesting and acquiring a vowed restraint is an incited karmic impulse. It was preceded by an inciting karmic impulse that propelled the action of mind, that of thinking about and deciding to take on the vowed restraint.

Karmic Impulses and Pathways of Karmic Impulses

Further, Buddha states that the revealing form is also a pathway of an incited karmic impulse. In general, the pathway of a karmic impulse (las-kyi lam, Skt. karmapatha) refers to a karmic action of the body, speech or mind – most frequently, the ten destructive and the ten constructive actions. As later Indian commentators elaborate, the pathway of a karmic impulse has many components – a basis toward which an action is directed, a motivating intention, a distinguishing of the basis, a motivating emotion, the implementation of a method for committing the action, and a finale. Here, when referring to the revealing form with which that implementation is enacted as a “pathway,” Buddha is giving the name of the whole to a part. It is like when we injure a part of our leg, we say we injured our leg. Thus, the revealing form of the action of the body during this initial phase of possessing the ethical self-discipline of a vowed restraint is both an incited karmic impulse and the pathway of an incited karmic impulse. 

The revealing forms that subsequently arise when refraining from the destructive behavior that one vowed to avoid are karmic impulses of body or speech, but they are neither incited karmic impulses nor pathways of incited karmic impulses. Let us examine why that is the case. 

These subsequently arising revealing forms are the revealing forms of the body refraining, for instance, from taking a life or the speech refraining, for instance, from lying when the thought of feeling like taking a life or lying arises. Buddha explains that these revealing forms of body and speech refraining from transgressing the vowed restraints to abstain from committing such actions automatically arise in each moment of subsequently keeping the vowed restraints. They automatically arise as the result of the ethical self-discipline established during the first phase. Not being incited by the inciting karmic impulse (the urge) that propelled the mind to consider and decide to take on the vowed restraints, these revealing forms are not incited karmic impulses, although they are still karmic impulses. Not being incited karmic impulses, they are likewise not pathways containing incited karmic impulses. Although the quoted passage merely states that these revealing forms “are not pathways of karmic impulses,” the intended meaning is that they are not pathways of incited karmic impulses.   

In this quotation, however, Buddha does not specify the mechanism that accounts for maintaining, in subsequent moments after acquiring the vowed restraints, the automatic arising of the revealing forms of the ethical self-discipline of keeping these vowed restraints. For this, we must look to another sutra.    

Nonrevealing Forms

In The Noble Great Mahaparinirvana Sutra (‘Phags-pa yongs-su mya-ngan-las ‘das-pa chen-po’i mdo, Skt. Āryamahāparinirvāṇa Sūtra) (Derge Kangyur vol. 52, 207B), Buddha explains that another aspect of the ethical self-discipline of the constructive actions of requesting, acquiring and keeping the vowed restraints to refrain from specific types of destructive behavior of body and speech is its nonrevealing forms (rnam-par rig-byed ma-yin-pa’I gzugs, Skt. avijñaptirūpa):

Ethical self-discipline has seven aspects; namely, there are the seven (types of) nonrevealing forms of body and speech. By means of (the presence) of these nonrevealing forms as a circumstance, then even if the mind is abiding in a destructive or unspecified (state), it cannot be called a degeneration (or weakening) of the ethical self-discipline. The ethical self-discipline is still being upheld. 
(Tib.) tshul khrims la rnam pa bdun yod de/ lus dang ngag las rnam par rig byed ma yin pa’i gzugs yod do/ /rnam par rig byed ma yin pa’i gzugs kyi rkyen gyis sems mi dge ba’am/ lung du mi ston pa la gnas kyang tshul khrims nyams pa zhes mi bya ste/ tshul khrims srung ba’o/ 

The seven types of nonrevealing forms referenced here are the vowed restraints of full monks, full nuns, provisional nuns, novice monks, novice nuns, laymen, and lay women. 

Buddha identifies these nonrevealing forms as types of karmic impulses in (The Sutra of) the Close Placement of Mindfulness on the Noble Hallowed Dharma (‘Phags-pa dam-pa’i chos dran-pa nye-bar gzhag-pa, Skt. Āryasaddharmasmrtyupasthāna) (Derge Kangyur, vol. 68, 137b-138a):

Then further, monks, suppose you ask, among the eleven distinguishable forms, what are the ones that are considered as ripening nonrevealing forms that are karmic impulses and phenomena like? Well, among the internal phenomena of those with yogic behavior, those that are considered as phenomena (here) and that abide (in their mental continuums as karmic impulses) – having been received as being vowed restraints that will accompany everything they do – are the ones that enter, from then on, into a state of being a continuum of constructive phenomena, whether they are asleep, crazed or drunk. 
For example, like the stream of a river that always flows without a break, these (vowed restraints) are like that, whether these persons have entered into sleep, craziness or drunkenness. The nonrevealing forms that are like that are accepted as being invisible and as not impeding (the presence or motion of material phenomena). Suppose you ask what are these forms like? They are (phenomena that) are in a state of existence of being (phenomena) with the essential nature of karmic impulses. That being so, they are both forms and one of the eleven types (rnam-pa) of forms.
Distinguishable forms are divided into eleven types, (those distinguished as), “This form is long; this form is short; this form is pretty; this form is not pretty; this form is visible; this form impedes (the presence or motion of other material phenomena); this form is invisible; this form does not impede (the presence or motion of material phenomena),” up to nonrevealing forms.  
(Tib.) de nas gzhan yang dge slong de las dang / chos dang / rnam par smin pa rnam par rig byed ma yin pa’i ‘du shes kyi gzugs bcu gcig rjes su ji ltar mthong zhe na/ rnal ‘byor spyod pa nang gi chos la chos kyi rjes su lta zhing gnas pa des/ gang gi tshe chos thams cad kyi byed pa dang ldan pa gang sdom pa nyid blangs te/ de phan chad gnyid log gam/ myos sam/ rab tu myos kyang / dge ba’i chos kyi rgyun nyid rab tu ‘jug ste/ dper na/ chu bo’i rgyun bar chad med pa rtag tu ‘bab pa de bzhin du/ skyes bu de gnyid log gam/ myos sam/ rab tu myos pa’i ‘jug pa yang de bzhin no/ de ltar rnam par rig byed ma yin pa’i gzugs bstan du med pa/ thogs pa med par ‘dod do/ /gzugs de ji lta bu yin zhe na/ las kyi ngo bo nyid yod pa nyid yin te/ de lta bas na/ gzugs de yang / gzugs rnam pa bcu gcig po de dag yin la/ gzugs ‘di ni ring po/ gzugs ‘di ni thung ngu / gzugs ‘di ni sdug pa/ gzugs ‘di ni mi sdug pa/ gzugs ‘di ni bstan du yod pa/ gzugs ‘di ni thogs pa dang bcas pa/ gzugs ‘di ni bstan du med pa/ gzugs ‘di ni thogs pa med pa zhes rnam par rig byed ma yin pa’i bar rnam pa bcu gcig po ‘di ni ‘du shes kyi gzugs su rnam par dbye ste/

Note that the eleven types of distinguishable forms (‘du shes kyi gzugs, Skt. saṃjñārūpa) are not the same as the division of forms of physical phenomena into eleven types found in the Vaibhashika, Chittamatra and Madhyamaka presentations: five types of sensory objects (sights, sounds, smells, tastes, and physical sensations), five types of physical cognitive sensors (the sensitive cells of the eyes, ears, nose, tongue and body) and either nonrevealing forms or the fivefold set of forms that is included only among the cognitive stimulators that are all phenomena (chos-kyi skye-mched-kyi gzugs-kyi skye-mched-kyi gzugs). The definition of distinguishable forms and the full list of the eleven of them are not contained in any of the texts preserved in Tibetan translation in the Kangyur or Tengyur. In the sutra quoted, Buddha lists only eight of the eleven.

Buddha refers to the nonrevealing forms as “ripenings” (smin-pa, Skt. vipāka), meaning they are ripening causes. Ripening causes (rnam-smin-gyi rgyu, Skt. vipākahetu) are constructive or destructive phenomena that give rise to unspecified (lung ma-bstan, Skt. avyākṛta) phenomena – phenomena unspecified by Buddha to be either constructive or destructive. 

Nonrevealing forms are invisible, immaterial entities that are classified as forms of physical phenomena that do not impede the presence or motion of material phenomena and that can only be cognized by mental cognition. They arise simultaneously with the first phase of an incited revealing form, and a sequence of moments of them continues with the mental continuum during all subsequent moments after acquiring vowed restraints and are lost only when the vowed restraints are relinquished. The effect of their presence when acquiring vowed restraints is that, in subsequent moments, there automatically arises a steady stream of revealing forms of the body and speech refraining from committing the actions one vowed to abstain from. This occurs regardless of the person possessing them being asleep, crazed or drunk, so long as they have not relinquished their vowed restraints. 

Reinforced and Enacted Karmic Impulses 

Another classification scheme for karmic impulses found already in Mahayana sutras speaks of reinforced karmic impulses (bsags-pa’i las, Skt. upacitakarma) and enacted karmic impulses (byas-pa’i las, Skt. kṛtakarma). This variable affects whether there is certainty about the lifetime in which the positive or negative karmic force of a karmic impulse will begin to ripen. Those with certainty will definitely begin to ripen either in this lifetime, one’s immediately following lifetime or in some lifetime after that. Those without certainty can ripen in any lifetime; there is nothing definite about in which one.

Further, from (The Sutra) on the Close Placement of Mindfulness on the Noble Dharma (Derge 155B):

(There are karmic impulses that have been) enacted and reinforced, reinforced but not enacted, and enacted but not reinforced. Of those, those that have been enacted and reinforced have certainty of (the lifetime in which its ripening will begin) to be experienced; those that are reinforced but not enacted do not have certainty of (the lifetime in which its ripening will begin) to be experienced; and those that are enacted but not reinforced also do not have certainty of (the lifetime in which its ripening will begin) to be experienced.
(Tib.)  byas la bsags pa dang / bsags la mi byed pa dang / byas la ma bsags pa'o/ /de la byas la bsags pa ni myong ba 'gyur bar nges pa yin/ bsags la mi byed pa ni myong ba 'gyur bar nges pa ma yin/ byas la ma bsags pa 'di yang myong ba 'gyur bar nges pa ma yin no/ 

A reinforced karmic impulse is one whose positive or negative karmic force is strengthened – literally, “built up by” or “gathered from” various factors. An enacted karmic impulse is one that is implemented with the body or speech and that reaches its intended finale. Different texts present different criteria for identifying which types of karmic impulses are reinforced, enacted, both or neither. Here, let us look at the criteria listed by Buddha in texts translated into Tibetan and preserved in the Kangyur. Additional criteria are found in the texts by the Nalanda masters. These additional criteria, it is argued, were intended by Buddha when he spoke about reinforced and enacted karmic impulses. 

From Divisions of Karmic Impulses (Las rnam-par ‘byed-pa, Skt. Karmavibhaṅga) (Derge Kangyur vol. 72, 282A): 

Suppose it is asked, what is a karmic impulse among them that is enacted but not reinforced? It is a karmic impulse that, having been enacted, is grieved about, felt ashamed about, opposed, shrunk from, admitted, confessed and disclosed (as having been wrong) and that one takes on a vowed restraint not to do again in the future [Tib: It is a karmic impulse that, having been enacted, is held with shame, regret, disapproval, admission (as having been mistaken), contrition, (resolve to) give it up and vowed restraint from now on not to enact it (again).] This karmic impulse is enacted but not reinforced.
Suppose it is asked, what is a karmic impulse among them that is reinforced but not enacted? It is a karmic impulse that is yet to be brought to completion with the body and (concerning which) one utters the words, with an evil mind, “I will do thusly to you.” [Tib.: It is a karmic impulse that was to be brought to completion with the body but, having (merely) been brought it to completion with one’s mind and, having even been vocalized in words, “I shall enact this impulse,” was not enacted.] This karmic impulse is reinforced but not enacted.  
Suppose it is asked, what is a karmic impulse among them that is enacted and reinforced? It is a karmic impulse that is premeditated (ched-du bsams-pa, Skt. sāṁcetanika). [Tib.: It is a karmic impulse that, after having been enacted, is held without embarrassment, without rejection, without regret, without disapproval, without admission (as having been mistaken), without contrition, without (resolve to) rid oneself of it and without vowed restraint from now on not to enact it (again).] This karmic impulse is enacted and reinforced. 
Suppose it is asked, what is a karmic impulse among them that is not enacted and not reinforced? It is a karmic impulse that is not premeditated and is enacted in a dream or caused to be enacted (by having been made to enact it by someone else). This karmic impulse is not enacted and not reinforced.
(Skt.) tatra, katamat karma kṛtaṁ nopacitam? ucyate: yat kṛtvā karma āstīryati, jihreti, vigarhati, vijugupsati, deśayati, ācaṣṭe, vyaktī-karoti, āyatyāṁ saṁvaram āpadyate, na punaḥ karoti. idaṁ karma kṛtaṁ nopacitam. tatra, katamat karmopacitaṁ na kṛtam? ucyate: yat karma kāyena paripūrayitavyam. tatra, praduṣṭa-citto vācam bhāṣate, ‘evaṁ te kariṣyāmī’ ti. idaṁ karmopacitaṁ na kṛtam. tatra, katamat karma kṛtaṁ copacitaṁ ca? ucyate: yat karma sāṁcetanikam. idaṁ karma kṛtaṁ copacitaṁ ca. tatra, katamat karma naiva kṛtaṁ, naivopacitam? ucyate: yat karma [a]sāṁcetanikaṁ svapnāntare kṛtaṁ kāritaṁ vā. idaṁ karma naiva kṛtaṁ naivopacitam.
(Tib.) /de la byas la ma bsags pa'i las yod de de gang zhe na/ byas nas ngo tsha bar 'dzin pa dang 'gyod pa dang smod pa dang 'chags pa dang mthol ba dang / spong ba dang phyin cad mi byed par sdom pa ste/ las de lta bu ni byas pa ma bsags pa'o/ /de la bsags la ma byas pa'i las yod de de gang zhe na/ las gang lus kyis yongs su rdzogs par byas pa de/ /sems kyis yongs su rdzogs par byas shing tshig tu yang las 'di bya'o zhes smras la de ma byas pa ste/ las de lta bu ni bsags la ma byas pa'o/ /de la byas kyang byas la bsags kyang bsags pa'i las yod de de gang zhe na/ las gang byas nas mi 'dzem pa dang mi ldog pa dang mi 'gyod pa dang mi smod pa dang mi 'chags pa dang mi mthol ba dang mi 'dor ba dang / mi spong ba dang phyin cad mi sdom par byed pa ste/ las de lta bu ni byas kyang byas la bsags kyang bsags so/ /de la byas kyang ma byas la bsags kyang ma bsags pa'i las yod de de gang zhe na/ las gang ched du ma bsams par byas pa/ rmi lam na byas pa'am byed du bcug pa lta bu ste/ las de lta bu ni byas kyang ma byas la bsags kyang ma bsags pa'o/ 

From A Dharma Text Called “Varieties of Karmic Impulses” (Las-kyi rnam-par ‘gyur-ba zhes-bya-ba’i chos-kyi gzhung, Skt. Karmavibhaṅga-nāma-dharmagrantha) (Derge Kangyur vol. 72, 299b-300a, 303b-304a):

Rebirth occurs by (the karmic force of) karmic impulses that are enacted but not consciously boosted (bsam-pa, Skt. sāṁcetanika). Rebirth also occurs by (the karmic force of) karmic impulses that are not enacted even though they are consciously boosted. Rebirth also occurs by (the karmic force of) karmic impulses that are consciously boosted and then enacted. Rebirth also occurs even by (the karmic force of) karmic impulses that are neither consciously boosted nor enacted….
Suppose it is asked, what kind of karmic impulse is it that is enacted but not consciously boosted? It is a karmic impulse that, having been enacted, one regrets and has misgivings about, being ashamed, considers as having been a mistake and improper, admits (as having been wrong) and does not ignore as being insignificant, does not repeat and promises from now on never to enact again. A karmic impulse like that is enacted but not consciously boosted.
Suppose it is asked, what kind of karmic impulse is consciously boosted but not enacted? It is a karmic impulse that is yet to be enacted with the body and, having gone through it with the mind and having vocally declared, “I shall enact this impulse,” is then not enacted. A karmic impulse like that is consciously boosted but not enacted.
Suppose it is asked, what kind of karmic action is consciously boosted and then enacted? It is any karmic impulse that, having been enacted, one does not regret and does not have misgivings about, being ashamed, does not consider as having been a mistake, does not admit (as having been wrong) and ignores as being insignificant, repeats and does not promise from now on never to enact again. 
(Tib.) las ma bsams par byas pas skye bar ‘gyur ba yang yod/ las bsams te ma byas kyang skye bar ‘gyur ba yang yod/ las bsams te byas nas skye bar ‘gyur ba yang yod/ las ma bsams ma byas kyang skye bar ‘gyur ba yang yod do/….
/ji ltar las kyis ma bsams par byas pa gang zhe na/ las byas nas ‘gyod pa dang / khrel gyis dogs pa dang / nyes par sems pa dang / mi rigs pa dang / ‘chags pa dang / yal bar mi gtong ba dang / slar mi ‘jug pa dang / da phyin cad mi byed par dam ‘cha’ ba dang / ‘di lta bu’i las ni ma bsams par byas pa’o/ /ji ltar las bsams la ma byas pa gang zhe na/ lus kyis ma byas pa dang / sems rgyus shing las ‘di bya’o zhes khar smras la ma byas pa de lta bu’i las ni bsams te ma byas pa’o/ /ji ltar las bsams te byas pa gang zhe na/ las gang byas kyang rung ste mi ‘gyod pa/ khrel gyis mi dogs pa nyes par mi sems pa/ mi ‘chags pa/ yal bar gtong ba/ slar ‘jug pa/ phyin cad mi byed par dam mi ‘cha’ ba’o/

The text does not give an example of a karmic impulse that is not enacted and not consciously boosted.

It is noteworthy that where the Tibetan translation of the previous passage from Divisions of Karmic Impulses diverges significantly from the Sanskrit regarding a karmic impulse that is enacted and reinforced, it does so with a line that closely resembles the line concerning this type of karmic impulse in the above passage from A Dharma Text Called “Varieties of Karmic Impulses.” 

Furthermore, in Divisions of Karmic Impulses, the Sanskrit term sāṁcetanika is translated into Tibetan as ched-du bsams-pa – literally, “purposely urged,” meaning “urged from having been deliberated.” Thus, we have translated it as “premeditated.” In this case, the Sanskrit term is an adjectival derivative from the Sanskrit root cit (Tib. bsams-pa), “to urge,” with the prefix sam (Tib. ched-du). In A Dharma Text Called “Varieties of Karmic Impulses,” the Tibetan term bsams-pa, presumably translated from the Sanskrit saṁcita, seems also to derive from the Sanskrit root cit with the prefix sam. However, grammatically it is also a past passive particle derived from the Sanskrit root ci, “to build up,” with the prefix sam. Thus, it is similar to upacita – the Sanskrit term for “reinforced,” as in the technical term “reinforced karma” – which is a past passive particle derived also from the Sanskrit root ci but with the prefix upa. This interpretation of bsams-pa is strongly suggested by the parallels between the cited passages from these two texts and by the slightly reworded Tibetan line borrowed from one passage to the other. 

Thus, in the above passage from A Dharma Text Called “Varieties of Karmic Impulses,” the term “saṁcita” can best be translated as “consciously boosted” and taken as a synonym for upacita, “reinforced,” while also conveying the connotations of both the original Sanskrit and the Tibetan translation of the term in this passage. 

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