Glossary of Buddhist Terms

Full multilingual glossary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T U V Y Z

  1. eight worldly concerns

    Praise or criticism, good or bad news, gains or losses, things going well or poorly – eight things that one needs to avoid becoming overexcited or depressed about.


  2. eight worldly dharmas

    Praise or criticism, good or bad news, gains or losses, things going well or poorly – eight things that one needs to avoid becoming overexcited or depressed about.


  3. eightfold noble path

    Eight types of practices for developing the three higher trainings in ethical self-discipline, concentration and discriminating awareness.


  4. empowerment

    A tantric ritual that activates and empowers Buddha-nature factors to grow so that they will eventually bring about enlightenment.


  5. emptiness

    The total absence of an impossible way of existing. The impossible way of existing has never existed at all. Mostly rendered on this website as "voidness."


  6. energy-channel

    Tube-like channels in which the subtle energy-drops (bindu) are located and through which the energy-winds (prana) flow in the subtle body.


  7. energy-wind

    The subtle energy, associated with the breath and analogous to "winds,", that flows through the energy-channels (nadi) of the subtle body.


  8. engaged Buddhism

    A modern Buddhist movement for applying Buddhist principles to deal with social and political injustices and environmental issues.


  9. enlightenment

    The state of a Buddha, in which one has attained a true stopping (cessation) of both the emotional obscurations and the cognitive obscurations and has realized in full all good qualities for being able to benefit others as much as is possible.


  10. envy

    A disturbing emotion that is unable to bear the good qualities, possessions or success of others and wishes to have them for oneself.


  11. equanimity

    The mental factor of having an equal attitude toward everyone.


  12. ethical self-discipline

    (1) In Theravada, the subsidiary awareness (mental factor) to avoid doing any harm to others, by keeping one's vows, free from anger or ill-will even if others harm one. (2) In Mahayana, the mental urge to safeguard the actions of one's body, speech, and mind, which comes from having turned one's mind away from any wish to cause harm to others and from the disturbing and destructive mental factors that had motivated one to harm others. When conjoined with a bodhichitta aim, it becomes a far-reaching attitude.


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